The Seventh Test Sydney 1971

On Wednesday August 1 2018 at Edgbaston an England team walks on the field to begin a Test match for the 1000th time.

Among the reflections, the listicles and the shallow on-line polls, people have been choosing their greatest and/or favourite Test matches of the previous 999 (actually 1004 if you count washouts and cancellations). Headingley 1981 and Edgbaston 2005 are both, quite rightly, very popular selections. Lack of television footage and eyewitness recollections from The Oval 1882 have prevented it from polling as high.

I’ve chosen a different Test as a personal favourite, an eventful match that occupies a seminal place in England’s Test cricket history. I give you 1970-71’s Seventh Test against Australia.

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Yesterday’s Papers Today: the Adelaide Test 1932-33

Third Test, Adelaide, January 13-19 1933: England 341 and 412, Australia 222 and 193. England won by 338 runs.

One of the most infamous Test matches in the history of contests between Australia and England began on Friday the Thirteenth of January 1933. The timeless Test ended the following Thursday in a decisive England victory and the unfolding of an international incident. Continue reading “Yesterday’s Papers Today: the Adelaide Test 1932-33”

Yesterday’s papers today: the Brisbane Test of 1950-51

First Test, Brisbane, December 1-5 1950: Australia 228 & 7/32 dec, England 7/68 dec & 122. Australia won by 70 runs.

But first, an assurance by England captain Freddie Brown that all is well in the touring party: Continue reading “Yesterday’s papers today: the Brisbane Test of 1950-51”

Yesterday’s papers today: Broadcasting the Ashes 1928 1932

Broadcasting the Ashes of 1928-29 and 1932-33 – some clippings from the newspapers of the time as preserved by Trove, the glorious digital archive hosted by the National Library of Australia:

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A bit of light reading about the 1999-2000 England womens tour

England’s women’s cricket team headed to the Antipodes in January 2000 to play one-day internationals in Australia and New Zealand. By the time they were ready to head east across the Tasman, England had lost the ODI series to Australia 0-4 and Karen Smithies had resigned as captain.

Working for Cricinfo at the time I covered every ODI of the Australian leg of the tour, and I believe I have the only comprehensive documentation of these games. Continue reading “A bit of light reading about the 1999-2000 England womens tour”

Australia’s one-day competition: 49 not out

Australia’s male domestic one-day competition ends its 49th season today at Blundstone Arena, Bellerive, with South Australia playing Western Australia.

Shunted to the October pre-season but still a more substantial competition than the V&G Knockout or Gillette Cup of its early years, as the JLT One-Day Cup it now sports its eleventh naming rights sponsor. Not one, alas, that enables sausage sizzles cooked on the sponsor’s product on the hill, as sponsor number ten, Matador, did.
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Cricket in the Olympics? (1996 edition)

Cricket has made just one appearance in Olympic competition, in the second games of the modern olympiad, held in Paris in 1900. Continue reading “Cricket in the Olympics? (1996 edition)”

London 2012 Day After One: Party like it’s 1948

The Olympic Games are over. Now let’s take some deep breaths, and take some time to get the euphoria out of our systems before reflecting on what it all means. Continue reading “London 2012 Day After One: Party like it’s 1948”

A hundred years of Bradman

August 27, 2008 – a day of celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of the birth of Donald George Bradman. And they celebrated at his birthplace, Cootamundra, the hometown of his youth, Bowral, and in a black tie dinner at the business end of Sydney. Has any other sportsperson, in any sport, anywhere in the world, been celebrated quite so much as The Don? Continue reading “A hundred years of Bradman”

Twenty21 revisited

If we didn’t know before, we do now. Australia’s 5-0 drubbing of England in 2006-07 is the first such triumph since 1920-21. But which was the bigger achievement? Continue reading “Twenty21 revisited”