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Welcome to the new website for rickeyrecricket.com

I am rebuilding the website into a collection of all my thoughts and observations on cricket over the years, as well some new work. There’s a lot of archival material still to be added. Today In Cricket History is currently off-line but I intend to bring that back with a fresh look in the future.

As always, the best place to catch up with me is on Twitter at @rickeyrecricket. If you have the Telegram messaging app (and I highly recommend it), I have a read-only news channel at @rickeyrecricket and feel free to catch up with me there at @rickeyre.

I also have a page on Facebook and on Instagram

See you soon
Rick

 

 

You've never seen a scoreboard like that on lunch on Day 1 of a Test match in Australia. David Warner 100 not out.

A post shared by Rick Eyre on cricket (@rickeyrecricket) on

 

Blog

Much of my bloggage and other material, some dating back to 1996. (While I am rebuilding my website, much material prior to 2015 can be found here.) Please use the Categories, Archives and Search facilities and take a look around.

The grim trial of strength that went mainstream: women’s Test cricket

Before the Australian women’s cricket team played their touring England counterparts in Brisbane in December 1934, the following directive appeared in the Courier Mail:   No one in the press or elsewhere paid any attention to this instruction, and the first women’s Test match concluded at the Brisbane Exhibition Ground on New Year’s Eve 1934, …

Two Starc hat tricks and a stunning NSW victory

Hurstville Oval’s first Sheffield Shield match turned into a cracker. Victory to NSW over WA by 171 runs at 6.14pm on the final day with Mitchell Starc taking his second hat-trick of the match. I was at the ground for the final two sessions of the last day.

A bit of light reading about the 1999-2000 England womens tour

England’s women’s cricket team headed to the Antipodes in January 2000 to play one-day internationals in Australia and New Zealand. By the time they were ready to head east across the Tasman, England had lost the ODI series to Australia 0-4 and Karen Smithies had resigned as captain. Working for Cricinfo at the time I …

About

Rick Eyre has been following cricket for more than 45 years, and has been writing about the sport on online social media and throughrickeyre_20120117 his own website since 1994. One of a group of people internationally who built Cricinfo (now ESPNCricinfo) into the world’s dominant cricket website in the late 1990s and early 2000s, Rick was one of its first full-time staff members and its first editor.

Rick’s online feature. Today In Cricket History, was created in 1992 and published as a paperback in 2009. It was the initial basis of Rick’s cricket website which was first created in December 1994.

Rick has written about cricket for sporting websites including Crikey, The Roar and iSportconnect, and has taken part in media interviews ranging from Australian community radio through to the BBC. He operated a website specialising in women’s cricket news, cricketwoman.com, in the early 2000s. In 2005 he created the first podcast specialising in cricket, “The Net Sessions”. Rick was featured in the 2006 Wisden Almanack report on cricket on the internet.

Today Rick actively talks about cricket through his blog and his Twitter account @rickeyrecricket. He is developing an advocacy project relating to humanitarian programs involving sport, including cricket.

Rick is available for paid writing and research work. He lives in Sydney on land traditionally owned by the Wangal people of the Eora nation. He follows the Sydney Thunder and New South Wales women’s and men’s cricket teams.

Much of Rick’s by-lined work for Cricinfo can be seen here.

Rick was interviewed for the website Bettingrunner.com in April 2016.

Contact details for media or business enquiries can be found here.