Dee-fence Surrey, dee-fence!

I haven’t ranted much about Surrey on these pages for a while. Their performances in their last seven days – played over ever-decreasing durations – do not leave me with any great feelings of joy.
Continue reading “Dee-fence Surrey, dee-fence!”

Leicestershire v Australia

Leicestershire are batting first against Australia, and finally it’s starting to feel like an Ashes tour. It seems utterly mad that we are this far into the English summer, and not only has the England-Australia series not yet begun, but we’re only getting the first three-day tour match today.

Interesting to see that the Cricket Australia live scorecard is ahead of that of the Press Association outlets – at least at the time of writing (Leicestershire 27/1 on the first morning).

It will also be interesting to see how New South Wales all-rounder Jason Krejza goes for Leicestershire.

The Leicestershire v Australia tradition began in 1893 with a two-day match at Grace Road dominated by Harry Trott, who scored 100 and took eleven wickets.

The first first-class match between the two came in 1896, with Leicestershire narrowing avoiding a big innings defeat after Australian captain George Giffen took 14 wickets for the match.

It’s worth keeping an eye on the Leicestershire CCC website over the next three days. They’re putting a lot of effort into promotion for this game. Saturday is Fancy Dress day. Wow!

Oh Asia where art thou?

The 2005 ICC Trophy is almost run and won, but the final still to be played on Wednesday, the five berths for the 2007 World Cup have been filled. Congratulations to Bermuda and Ireland, who have qualified for their first World Cup. Congratulations also to Canada and Holland, who remain in World Cup play, and to Scotland, who return after taking part in 1999. Continue reading “Oh Asia where art thou?”

And cricket goes on

I don’t know what I would have done if I had tickets to Lord’s today.

I’m pleased, nonetheless, to see that the two remaining England v Australia ODIs at Lord’s and The Oval are going ahead. The British response to Thursday’s outrage has been quite stirring.
Continue reading “And cricket goes on”

Why a tie?

For those who cared enough to follow the NatWest Series, the tournament ended in anticlimax when England and Australia played out a tie. But why was it called a tie? Both sides scored 196, that is true – but Australia was bowled all out while England only lost nine wickets. There’s an easy way to break the deadlock and it’s none other than the bleeding obvious.
Continue reading “Why a tie?”

Eleven a side: The grand final

England and Australia are meeting today in what could well be the last one-day international played between teams of eleven players each. Lawrence Booth is doing the blog you have when you’re not having a blog at The Guardian. Follow the live scorecard at The Cricket Site (who, hopefully, will fix their home page which currently states that Bangladesh are playing in today’s final). Live audio from BBC Five Live Extra.

Progress score: Australia 3, France 0. Ten minutes into the first half. Channel Seven’s coverage of the cricket commences after the rugby.

Enough, Zimbabwe!

Sadly, I think it’s time for the ICC to suspend Zimbabwe from all international cricket competition. Mugabe’s conduct in running the country has finally, in my opinion, made it untenable for any side to play cricket there. The ICC, of course, is going to do no such thing.

In the past I’ve supported Zimbabwean cricket’s right to remain on the world stage, acknowledging the complexity of political and commercial interests that have bound the ICC and its members. But how, really, can we continue to justify sending teams to play in a country whose fabric is being torn to shreds by a reckless and deluded president, who just happens to also be Patron of the Zimbabwe Cricket Union? The “Drive Out Rubbish” program is, for me, the last straw. Continue reading “Enough, Zimbabwe!”

Keeping it Cricket in the City of Compton

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4724238

We’ve heard much over the years of Ted Hayes and his work in organising street kids into cricket teams in Los Angeles. NPR‘s (National Public Radio) News and Notes program on Thursday did a feature on Hayes’ latest project – the Dome Village of Compton, California – and its cricket team, the Compton Homies. Continue reading “Keeping it Cricket in the City of Compton”

Andrew Symonds 5-18

Is there a message in this somewhere? Something along the lines of “try sacking me now you bastards”…

Symonds saves Australia

The question has to be asked: If Andrew Symonds stayed off the turps last Friday night, would Australia be undefeated in the NatWest Series today? Continue reading “Symonds saves Australia”